Welcome to a replay of our virtual Urban Education Conference that occurred from May 26-28, 2020. All sessions are listed below. Thank you for viewing and feel free to connect with us! https://chicagoaicc.com/education/

A special thank you to all of our sponsors for without their support, this conference would not have been possible:

The Spencer Foundation, The Woods Fund, American Indian Center of Chicago, Chicago Public Schools American Indian Education Program, Field Museum, University of Illinois at Chicago Native American Support Program, University of Illinois Champaign-Urban Native American House, Newberry Library, St. Kateri Center of Chicago, and Visionary Ventures.

– Education Subcommittee, Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative

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Opening Keynote: Cynthia Soto (Sicangu Lakota), CAICC Representative, Chantay Moore (Navajo/African American), CAICC Education Subcommittee Chair, & Samantha Selby (Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians), CAICC Education Subcommittee Chair

Session Date: 5/26/2020

Session Time: 12:00 PM – 12:40 PM (CT)

Session Description: Welcoming and Overview of Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative (CAICC) and CAICC Education Subcommittee

Presenter(s):

  • Cynthia Soto (Sicangu Lakota), CAICC Representative: is the Director of the Native American Support Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She earned her B.A. in Elementary Education and a M.A. in Education-Instructional Leadership from UIC. Cynthia has worked within education for over 25 years focused on community and culturally based programs and initiatives.

  • Chantay Moore (Navajo/African American), CAICC Education Committee Co-Chair: Project Coordinator, Chicago Public Schools American Indian Education Program

  • Samantha Selby (Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians), CAICC Education Committee Co-Chair: is a current Master of Social Work (MSW) student at DePaul University focusing her studies on community development. Samantha earned her B.A. in Sociology from DePaul University in 2015, where her focus of study was working with delinquent youth.

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Session Title: Indigenous Peoples’ Day-Chicago Workshop

Session Date: 5/26/2020

Session Time:1:00 – 1:40 PM (CT)

Session Organization: American Indian Center Incorporated

Session Description: Abolishing Columbus Day in Chicago and the celebration of Indigenous Peoples’ Day is an opportunity to recognize and celebrate the true history of the Western Hemisphere which aims to unify people across cultural identities to celebrate our resiliency from colonial violence as we all strive for a better future. During this workshop, attendees will walk away with a deeper understanding of the impact of Columbus Day on BIPOC communities, how to utilize that information and ways to support Chicago’s City Ordinance 02019-6976

Session Presenter:

Fawn E. Pochel (First Nations Oji-Cree), Education Coordinator American Indian Center

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Session Title: Visibility and Belonging in Higher Education

Session Date: 5/26/2020

Session Time: 3:00 PM – 3:40 PM (CT)

Session Organization: Native American Support Program, the University of Illinois at Chicago

Session Description: Our workshop pulls from a declaration created by the American Indian College Fund (AICF), titled “Creating Visibility and Healthy Learning Environments for Native Americans in Higher Education.” The workshop relates closely to the theme – Indigenous Futures 2020- by discussing best practices on how to provide a safe and supportive learning environment for our future leaders of tomorrow. In this session, we will explore the eight best practices proposed in the declaration, apply them to our respective institutions, and share which practices our institutions are and are not implementing. This workshop will provide an opportunity for higher education academic professionals to share, evaluate, and develop best practices on how to build a more inclusive and vibrant campus.

Session Presenter(s):

Jacob Adams (Colville Nation) is the Program Coordinator for the Native American Support Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Jacob is a two-time graduate of the University of Washington, where he earned his B.A. degree in Social Welfare and a M.A. in Social Work with a specialization in health/mental health. He takes pride in being an underrepresented and first-generation college student. He has been working in higher education student support for the last five years and is committed to helping students reach their fullest potential.

Cynthia Soto (Sicangu Lakota) is the Director of the Native American Support Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). She earned her B.A. in Elementary Education and a M.A. in Education-Instructional Leadership from UIC. Cynthia has worked within education for over 25 years focused on community and culturally based programs and initiatives.

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Mid-Conference Keynote: Santiago X (Coushatta Tribe and Indigenous Chamoru from the Island of Guam U.S.A [Hacha’Maori])

Session Date: 5/27/2020

Session Time: 12:00 PM – 12:40 PM (CT)

Session Description: Santiago X, M.Arch, MFA, Koasati/Chamoru, will discuss his active role within the Indigenous Futurist movement, and the reclamation of the Indigenous futurescape within the virtual and built environment. He will speak on the resurgence of Indigenous mound building, through his recent work, his strategies for Indigenous empowerment through art, and decode the embedded truths of his recent contribution to the Chicago Architecture Biennial.

Session Presenter:

SANTIAGO X, M.Arch, MFA is an Indigenous futurist and multidisciplinary artist specializing in land, architectural, and new media installation. He is an enrolled citizen of the Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana (Koasati) and Indigenous Chamoru from the Island of Guam U.S.A (Hacha’Maori). Santiago x has exhibited and designed Internationally, including The World Expo in Shanghai, China, Venice Biennale in Venice, Italy, and Ars Electronica in Linz, Austria. He is a 2019 3Arts Award Winner, an invited contributor in the current Chicago Architecture Biennial, and a 2020 American Arts Incubator Art and Technology Fellow.

Currently, Santiago x is reinvigorating the ancestral mound building practice of his Koasati people, via two large-scale augmented public earthwork installations along with the Chicago and Des Plaines River in Chicago, Illinois. This is notably the first time effigy earthworks have been constructed by Indigenous peoples in North America since the founding of the United States. POKTO ČINTO (Serpent Twin Mound) publicly opened on Indigenous Peoples Day, October, 14th 2019.

https://santiagox.com

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Session Title: “You can do it!” Vision and leadership for the future

Session Date: 5/27/2020

Session Time: 1:00 PM – 1:40 PM (CT)

Session Organization: Northwestern University

Session Description: In many communities, non for profit organizations are the vehicles for change and development of vision and leadership. Many non profits struggle to attract and develop diverse leadership for their boards especially inter-generational members. In this session, you will learn what it takes to serve as a non for profit board member, primary responsibilities, best practices and what steps you might take to prepare for a volunteer board position. Whether you are young, old, seasoned or have never served, this is an opportunity to explore your options and take stock of the talents and passion you can offer non profits as they work to change the future for their community.

Session Presenter:

Pamala Silas (Menominee) has been a recognized leader for over 30 years addressing issues of equity, leadership, community development, housing and education in under-represented communities. She has successfully lead regional and national non-profit organizations and served on boards, councils, task forces and advisory for these issues.

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Session Title: Adversity and Resiliency for Chicago’s First, the State of Racial Justice for American Indian Chicagoans

Session Date: 5/27/2020

Session Time: 3:00 PM – 3:40 PM (CT)

Session Organization: Native American Support Program, The University of Illinois at Chicago

Session Description: Chicago American Indian Community organizations collaborated with the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy (IRRPP) to publish the report, “Adversity and Resiliency for Chicago’s First, the State of Racial Justice for American Indian Chicagoans.” It is the first report in over 30 years for the Chicago American Indian community to examine current and available data from the U.S. Census, American Community Survey, Home Mortgage Disclosure Act, and the Chicago Public Schools portal. It highlights data on education, housing, justice and economics from an often-invisible population in the city. The report ties into the theme of the conference Indigenous Futures as we believe data, although challenging and not always reflective of Native American populations, can tell a story about the histories but also guide educators, communities, policy makers, and institutions in dismantling and pushing the current narratives of communities for future generations. The report continues to be shared across the city with various institutions, philanthropists, and policy makers to bring the voice of Chicago American Indian to the forefront of their initiatives and funding. The group comprised of faculty, and community members propose a workshop sharing an overview of the data collected followed by a panel discussion to discuss the impact and possible next steps created by the report. Panel moderated by Dr. Faith Kares, Associate Director with UIC’s IRRPP, and panel discussion with Dr. Angela Walden (Cherokee), Director, UIC Office of Diversity, Assistant Professor of Psychology; Shelly Tucciarelli (Oneida), Executive Director of Visionary Ventures NFP Corporation and Owner of Turtle Clan Development Services,LLC; Cynthia Soto (Lakota), Director of the Native American Support Program at UIC.

Session Presenter(s):

Cynthia Soto (Sicangu Lakota) is the Director of the Native American Support Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She earned her B.A. in Elementary Education and a M.A. in Education-Instructional Leadership from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Cynthia has worked within education for over 25 years focused on community and culturally based programs and initiatives.

Faith R. Kares is an Associate Director with UIC’s Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy. She is trained as a cultural anthropologist and specializes in race/ethnicity, urban development, and community-based research. Dr. Kares’ work raises questions of equity and access, and she is dedicated to community-university partnerships and making research legible to communities outside of academia. She obtained her PhD in anthropology from Northwestern.

Angela L. Walden (Cherokee Nation) is the Director of Inclusion Initiatives in the Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity and Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Walden’s research focuses on community-based prevention and intervention with underserved and marginalized populations, including Native Americans living in urban communities (e.g., increasing capacity for non-mental health workforces to support the mental health of children and families).

Shelly Tucciarelli (Oneida Nation of Wisconsin) has over 20 years of experience in management, training, administration and development of affordable housing and community development. Shelly owns Turtle Clan Development Services (TCDS). Shelly provides real estate development services and affordable housing consulting services. TCDS focuses on professional services to increase the supply and quality of housing and economic development in Indian Country nationwide.

Jasmine Gurneau (Oneida/Menominee) earned a Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from DePaul University and a Master of Arts in Learning Sciences from Northwestern University. She is a Community Representative of the Citywide American Indian Education Council for Chicago Public Schools and has served as the Co-Chair for the Chicago American Indian Community Collaborative’s Education Committee. She was a 2015 Fellow with Cultivate: Women of Color Leadership program and was named one of Chicago Scholars’ 35 Under 35 Young Leaders Making An Impact.

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Closing Keynote: Frank Waln (Sicangu Lakota)

Session Date: 5/28/2020

Session Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM (CT)

Session Description: Lakota Hip Hop Artist Frank Waln will perform new works and share the origin stories of his songs to illustrate how we as Indigenous artists can honor our past & ancestors, engage present issues in our communities and imagine a better future through art rooted in culture and Indigenous thought process. He will break down his creative process as a music producer, engineer and songwriter to show how Lakota songwriting and storytelling influence his work as a contemporary Hip Hop artist and musician. Frank Waln will also discuss how art rooted in Lakȟól wičhóȟʼaŋ (Lakota way of life) influences his current work helping co-curate a music interactive space in the new Native Exhibition Hall at the Field Museum.

Session Presenter:

Frank Waln is an award-winning Sicangu Lakota Hip Hop artist and music producer from the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. A recipient of the Gates Millennium Scholarship, Waln attended Columbia College Chicago where he received a BA in Audio Arts and Acoustics. Waln’s awards include three Native American Music Awards, the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development 2014 Native American 40 Under 40, the 2014 Chicago Mayor’s Award for Civic Engagement, and the 2016 3Arts Grant for Chicago Artists. He has been featured in Buzzfeed, The Fader, Playboy, Vibe, NPR, ESPN, and MTV’s Rebel Music Native America. Waln has written for various publications including Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education, and Society and The Guardian. Frank Waln travels the world telling his story through performance and doing workshops focusing on self-empowerment and expression of truth.

http://frankwaln.com

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Session Title: Engaging Chicago Community Members to Shape Research: An Interactive Session Focused on the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Community Engagement Advisory Board

Session Date: 5/28/2020

Session Time: 2:00 PM – 2:40 PM (CT)

Session Organization: Center for Clinical and Translational Science

Session Description: The Community Engagement Advisory Board (CEAB) within the UIC Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS) is comprised of both academic health researchers and community members from the Chicagoland area. The board provides a platform for interactive feedback between researchers and CEAB members to think through and develop upon research-related topics including community engagement in health research, participant recruitment and retention strategies, and implementation and dissemination of study findings. CEAB members represent a wide range of professional and lived expertise including working with diverse racial groups, youth, LGBTQIA+, veterans, immigrants, and a wide range of medical and mental health conditions. Along with their expertise, they help to expand the public health impact of research and educate the next generation of researchers about the importance of community-engaged and inclusive research. Provided with this session, we aim to: 1) share information about the critical role that advisory boards, such as the CEAB can play in shaping the direction and actions of researchers across a variety of disciplines and interests; 2) describe the ways in which the CEAB in particular has provided consultation and support for research in the Chicago area, with a particular emphasis on research with underserved communities; 3) describe and answer questions about how members of Chicago’s Native American community can participate in the CEAB; and 4) allow presenters and attendees of this interactive session to discuss feedback and ideas for how the CEAB can partner with the Native community in Chicago to better meet community/population needs and goals for the future of Indigenous Chicago. Furthermore, attendees will leave this session with an increased knowledge of the CEAB, tools for the implementation on how to create a community engagement advisory board, how it has contributed to the advancing inclusive and community engaged research while also helping to spark interest in how the Native community in Chicago can become involved.

Session Presenter(s):

Gabriela Peña, MPH is a Research Specialist in the Community Engagement and Collaboration Core (CEC) within the UIC Center of Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS). As a co-coordinator of the CEC’s Community Engagement Advisory Board (CEAB) and team member with wide-ranging roles on numerous projects such as the development two local health registries and many cross-collaborations with local organizations, Gabriela’s work transcends many public health issues. Through her work, she hopes to continue to close the gap in health inequities and strengthen the larger public health infrastructure.

Angela Walden, PhD (Cherokee Nation) is the Director of Inclusion Initiatives in the Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity and Assistant Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Walden’s research focuses on community-based prevention and intervention with underserved and marginalized populations, including Native Americans living in urban communities (e.g., increasing capacity for non-mental health workforces to support the mental health of children and families).

Amparo Castillo, MD,MS,PhD is acting Director of the UIC Midwest Latino Health Research Training and Policy Center, as well as the Center’s Training Coordinator. She develops and implements educational programs for community health workers and other health care professionals assisting the Hispanic and African American minorities. Dr. Castillo is also co-author and Senior Trainer of the Diabetes Empowerment Education Program (DEEP) and other health education programs addressing low health literacy among minority groups.

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Session Title: Advocating for Native Students in the 3rd Largest Urban School District

Session Date: 5/28/2020

Session Time: 3:00 PM – 3:40 PM (CT)

Session Organization: Chicago Public Schools American Indian Education Program

Session Description: We provide education services to all Native American Indian students within the Chicago Public Schools district. With just over 1,000 Native Americans presently enrolled in Chicago Public Schools (CPS), our analysis suggests that CPS may be neglecting the particular needs of these students in terms of test preparation and college readiness, and are not accurately counting our student population. According to The State of Racial Justice for American Indian Chicagoans report, “far from being passive recipients of U.S. public education, Native Americans have challenged misrepresentations of American Indians in schools and curricula, shedding light on colonial legacies that persist in many ways within our education systems. And yet, the benefits of educational attainment remain limited for many Native Americans”. In this open discussion, we will engage members of the Citywide American Indian Education Council to discuss continued advocacy goals and efforts to increase equity for Native students in CPS.

Session Presenter: Chantay Moore (Navajo/African American)- Project Coordinator, Chicago Public Schools American Indian Education Program